Archive for the ‘Video Game Reviews’ Category

By Keith Crandell Jr.

All-Stars has an amazing intro, so you can watch (or preferably listen) to it while reading this review! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDKXroc4Lsg

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Although Playstation All-Stars: Battle Royale is said to be inspired by, and more commonly compared to, Nintendo’s Super Smash Bros. series, the two games are very different. These are two clearly different, but equally respectable fighting games. The comparisons end with the notion that both bring together their respective first and third party franchises. Super Smash Bros. is one of the ultimate fighting games in video game history. Almost everyone knows Nintendo and its characters, so throwing them all together in a button mashing insanity feud makes perfect sense. It’s fun for anyone of any age and is extremely competitive, although Mario Kart 64 may be more competitive among college students. PlayStation All-Stars: Battle Royale (All-Stars), developed by SuperBot Entertainment, is a competitive game, a legitimate and deep fighter, and one of the most entertaining things I’ve ever experienced. All-Stars is better than Super Smash Bros.

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by Keith Crandell Jr.

*Editor’s Note: This review covers Dissidia and Dissidia 012*

Dissidia’s initial selling point was the conflict between ten heroes and villains from the numbered installments.

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By Keith Crandell

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The main cast of Crisis Core. From left to right: Genesis, Angeal, Zack Fair, Sephiroth, Tseng, and Cloud Strife

Several years before Cloud Strife rode atop a train to commit unspeakable acts of terrorism, he was a wimpy little Shinra military grunt, and aspired to be strong enough to join SOLDIER, an elite military group. While he never actually made it into SOLDIER, his good friend Zack Fair did, SOLDIER First Class, in fact. Crisis Core –Final Fantasy VII- is Zack’s story, spanning the seven years leading up to Final Fantasy VII. The impact Zack has on Cloud is profound, and it’s great to see what actually happens to the man in this tragic story.

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By Keith Crandell

The main cast of Final Fantasy VII. Unfortunately, none of the cooler characters make an appearance until later in the game, and it’s hardly more than a cameo at that point.

The Compilation of Final Fantasy VII continues with perhaps the least loved installment, Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII. Breaking from the standard RPG formula of Final Fantasy VII, Dirge of Cerberus is actually a third person shooter starring the mysterious Vincent Valentine, an optional character from the original game, and his mission to stop Deepground, an organization hell bent on creating as much chaos as possible to destroy the planet. It’s actually a pretty solid shooter at that, but it isn’t particularly awesome, unless you love melodrama. Dirge of Cerberus is one of the darkest entries in the Final Fantasy series. Literally the darkest, with a dark story, overtones, and a dark picture on the TV screen.

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By Keith Crandell

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Final Fantasy: All The Bravest is the latest entry into the Final Fantasy series, one of a wide variety of notoriety, infamy, and success. All The Bravest is by far the worst entry in this wonderful series, insultingly so. The plot is nonexistent, and the premise is equally lousy.

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By Keith Crandell

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Final Fantasy XIII-2 displays Lightning on the box art, but hardly she’s hardly seen in the game at all.

Final Fantasy XIII-2 is the first numbered sequel in almost a decade in the Final Fantasy series, and picks up three years after the conclusion of Final Fantasy XIII. This time, Lightning’s sister Serah, and Noel, a mysterious boy from a distant future step up to save the world as they search for Lightning, who disappeared in the aftermath of Cocoon falling from the sky and crashing into Gran Pulse below. Final Fantasy XIII-2 was released in early 2012, and I think it’s terrible.

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By Keith Crandell

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I’m going to be upfront about this: Final Fantasy XIII is by no means the best game in the Final Fantasy series. It’s not even close. It’s a solid title, with varying strengths and weaknesses, and is not “garbage” or “an abomination to the greatest series of all time” as I’ve seen a few people put it. Final Fantasy reached the western audience in early 2010, and its main protagonist, a strong woman named Lightning, was intended by director Motomu Toriyama to be reminiscent of Final Fantasy VII’s Cloud Strife. Little did he know that not only was she indeed reminiscent of Cloud, but that Final Fantasy XIII would face a similar degree of controversy from the Final Fantasy fandom.

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By: John Groom

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In one of the few Final Fantasy games to actually fully feature crystals (you know, the main plot point for the first game), Final Fantasy: Crystal Chronicles takes the series to a whole new realm. The gameplay is unlike any other Final Fantasy game, where the player plays through a series of three months during each year. You see, the world of FFCC is covered in an evil mist called miasma. This mist slowly kills all of those who are found near it. The people of this world repel the miasma with crystals made from myrrh, a kind of magical secretion from special trees. Each year, every town sends out a caravan to gather myrrh in order to power their crystal, a risk that leads to death in many cases.

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Final Fantasy Tactics Advance Review: An ADVANCE-d Tactical Adventure!

By Ryan Noblet

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As a somewhat “noobish” Final Fantasy player (and owner of exactly zero Sony systems for the newer games…), I have not had the experiences of some of our other writers with this incredible series of games.  While I am slowly starting to catch back up in Fantasy land, I have recently started re-enjoying an often overlooked “side-quest” in the series: the Game Boy Advance title Final Fantasy Tactics Advance.  While it is by no means a perfect game or even close to being the best game in the series, it is certainly one of the strongest games ever created for a handheld system!

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By Jared Bonanminio

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The name “Ivalice Alliance” is a familiar term to the fans of the Final Fantasy series. Revenant Wings sparked the hype for this line of games in the series as the first to be announced in 2006 and released in Japan April 26, 2007. The game was altered and released in North America November 20, 2007 in an attempt to make the original Japanese version of the game more challenging for players.

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